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Home > Catholic Encyclopedia > A > Artemon

Artemon

(Or Artemas).

Mentioned as the leader of an Antitrinitarian sect at Rome, in the third century, about whose life little is known for certain. He is spoken of by Eusebius (Church History V.28) as the forerunner of Paul of Samosata, an opinion confirmed by the Acts of a council held at Antioch in 264, which connect the two names as united in mutual communion and support. Eusebius (loc. cit.) and Theodoret (Haer. Fab., II, 4; V, II) describe his teaching as a denial of Our Lord's Divinity and an assertion that He was a mere man, the falsification of Scripture, and an appeal to tradition in support of his errors. Both authors mention refutations: Eusebius an untitled work, Theodoret one known as "The Little Labyrinth", which has been attributed to a Roman priest Caius, and more recently, to Hippolytus, the supposed author of the Philosophoumena.

Sources

Schwane, in Kirchenlex., I, 1451; Bardenhewer, Gesch. d. altkirchl. Litt. (Freiburg, 1902), II, 514.

About this page

APA citation. Grey, F. (1907). Artemon. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01755a.htm

MLA citation. Grey, Francis. "Artemon." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01755a.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by William D. Neville.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. March 1, 1907. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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