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Home > Catholic Encyclopedia > D > François Duquesnoy

François Duquesnoy

(Called also FRANÇOIS FLAMAND, and in Italy IL FLAMINGO).

Born at Brussels, Belgium, 1594; died at Leghorn, Italy, 12 July, 1646. Duquesnoy was son of an excellent Dutch sculptor from whom he received his first lessons. At an early age he carved the figure of justice on the portal of the chancellerie at Brussels, and two angels for the entrance of the Jesuit church of that city. In 1619, at the age of twenty-five, he was sent by the Archduke Albert to study in Rome, and there he resided many years, executing various works of importance. To him we owe the handsome baldachinum over the high altar in St. Peter's, the colossal statue of St. Andrew with his cross, also in st. Peter's, and the Santa Susanna in the church of S. Maria di Loreto. In the cathedral of Ghent is his rococo tomb for Bishop Triest a good work in its own style. Duquesnoy was a contemporary of Bernini and a friend of Le Poussain, who recommended him to Cardinal Richelieu. The sculptor was about to start for Paris when death overtook him at Leghorn. It is reported that he was poisoned by his own brother, Jérôme, who was also a clever sculptor (b. 1612, burned for unnatural crime, 24 Oct., 1654). François is famous for his beautiful sporting children in marble and bronze, his ivory carvings for drinking-cups, etc. The figure known to the populace of Brussels as the "Mannecken" is commonly attributed to him.

About this page

APA citation. Handley, M.L. (1909). François Duquesnoy. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05206b.htm

MLA citation. Handley, Marie Louise. "François Duquesnoy." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 5. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1909. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05206b.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by Joseph P. Thomas.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. May 1, 1909. Remy Lafort, Censor. Imprimatur. +John M. Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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