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Home > Catholic Encyclopedia > M > Delegation Apostolic of Mesopotamia, Kurdistan, and Armenia

Delegation Apostolic of Mesopotamia, Kurdistan, and Armenia

Created by Gregory XVI on 17 Dec., 1832. Mgr. Trioche, Archbishop of Babylon or Bagdad, became its first titular; he resided habitually in Bagdad. Resigning in 1850; Mgr. Trioche returned to France, retaining his title of Archbishop of Bagdad, but losing that of Apostolic delegate which passed to other bishops. These, while having charge of the administration of the Archdiocese of Bagdad, resided at Mosul, where they could better discharge their duties as Apostolic delegates in behalf of the Chaldeans, Syrians, and Armenians. Four out of six, from 1850 to 1887, were Dominicans. When Mgr. Trioche died in France 27 Nov., 1887, the delegate Apostolic, Mgr Altmayer, received the title of Archbishop of Babylon or Bagdad, but continued to reside at Mossul. In 1902 he resigned and was replaced in the See of Bagdad by a Carmelite, Mgr. Drure, who on 5 March, 1904, received the title of delegate Apostolic of Mesopotamia and still bears it. He usually resides at Mossul. The Delegation Apostolic of Mesopotamia has almost the same boundaries as the Archdiocese of Bagdad, but comprises part of the mission of Greater Armenia and the Nestorians of Turkish Kurdistan, which mission is confided to the Dominicans of Mossul. (See BAGDAD; MOSSUL.)

Sources

PIOLET, Les Missions, I (Paris, 1900), 236-44.

About this page

APA citation. Vailhé, S. (1911). Delegation Apostolic of Mesopotamia, Kurdistan, and Armenia. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10210b.htm

MLA citation. Vailhé, Siméon. "Delegation Apostolic of Mesopotamia, Kurdistan, and Armenia." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 10. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1911. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10210b.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by Douglas J. Potter. Dedicated to the Immaculate Heart of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. October 1, 1911. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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