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Home > Catholic Encyclopedia > O > Osimo

Osimo

DIOCESE OF OSIMO (AUXIMANA).

Diocese in the Province of Ascoli Piceno, Italy. Osimo was contained in the territory of the Donation of Pepin. In the conflicts between the popes and the Swabian emperors, it was Ghibelline; but remained faithful when in 1375, at the instigation of the Florentines, nearly all the cities of the Pontifical States rebelled against the Holy See. Among other rulers it had Pandolfo Malatesta (1416); Francesco Sforza (1435); and finally, Buccolino, who surrendered the city to the Holy See in 1494. Remnants of the Roman walls and baths still exist; the cathedral is of the eighth century, restored and enlarged by Bishop Gentilis (1205); the baptistery of the church of St. John the Baptist is notable; the communal palace possesses a collection of inscriptions; the Collegio Campana had among its students Leo XII and Pius VIII. Saints Florentius, Sisinnius, and Diocletius were martyrs of Osimo; the city venerates as its first bishop St. Leopardus, of unknown era; the first bishop of certain date is Fortunatus (649). Among its prelates were Vitalianus (743), and Gentilis (1177). Gregory IX transferred the see to Ricanati in 1240 to punish Osimo for its felony, but Bishop Rinaldo persuaded Urban IV to restore the see to Osimo, and the first bishop thereafter was St. Benvenuto Scotivoli (d. 1283), who was succeeded by Berardo Berardi, afterwards cardinal; C. Giovanni Uguccione (1320), who died in prison, for which reason the see was again suppressed, the bishops residing at Cingoli; Urban VI restored the diocese, and among its subsequent bishops were Antonino Ugolino Sinibaldi (1498); Cardinal Antonio M. Galli (1591); and the Dominican Cardinal Galamini (1620). Under Bishop Agostino Pipia, Benedict XIII re-established the Diocese of Cingoli, uniting it to that of Osimo.

Cingoli, an ancient city of Piceno, is frequently named in connexion with the war between Cæsar and Pompey; its cathedral of Santa Maria is of the seventeenth century; the Gothic church of Sant'Esuperanzio is a notable temple. The first known bishop of this see was Theodosius (495) succeeded by Julianus, who accompanied Pope Vigilius to Constantinople in 544; between the dates of Theodosius and Julianus is placed the incumbency of St. Esuperantius, whose history is legendary. No other bishops of Cingoli are known. The Diocese of Osimo is subject directly to the Holy See; it has 34 parishes, with 49,200 inhabitants, 2 religious houses of men, and 4 of women, 2 schools for boys and 2 for girls.

Sources

CAPPELLETTI, Le Chiese d'Italia, VII; MARTORELLI, Memorie storiche della città di Osimo (Venice, 1705); COMPAGNONI, Memorie della Chiesa e dei vescovi di Osimo (Rome, 1782).

About this page

APA citation. Benigni, U. (1911). Osimo. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11338a.htm

MLA citation. Benigni, Umberto. "Osimo." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 11. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1911. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11338a.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by Richard Hemphill.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. February 1, 1911. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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