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Home > Catholic Encyclopedia > R > Rudolf of Fulda

Rudolf of Fulda

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Chronicler, d. at Fulda, 8 March, 862. In the monastery of Fulda Rudolf entered the Benedictine Order, studied under the celebrated Rabanus Maurus, and was himself a teacher. He was undoubtedly associated with King Louis the Pious, whose intimate friend he considered himself, but it is not known how long he remained at court. It is probable that, after the elevation of Rhabanus to the Archiepiscopal See of Mainz, Rudolf followed him thence, and only towards the close of his life took up his permanent residence once more at Fulda. He was one of the most distinguished scholars of his time. The "Annales Fuldenses", begun by Einhard and continued (838-63) on the same lines by Rudolf, are valuable contributions to the general history of the period on account of his close connection with the court. Among the many editions of the "Annales Fuldenses sive Annales regni Francorum orientalis", that of Kurze (Hanover, 1891) is the best (German tr.by Wattenbach, "Geschichtsschreiber der deutschen Vorzeit", XXIII, Leipzig, 1889). At the suggestion of his master Rabanus, Rudolf (838) compiled, from notes of the priest Mego and from oral tradition, a life of St. Lioba or Leobgyth (published in "Acta SS.", VII, Sept., Antwerp ed., 760-9, and in "Mon. Germ. Script.", XV, i, 121-31). It was St. Lioba whom St. Boniface called to Bischofsheim on the Tauber to assist him by her activity. Under the misleading title, "Vita beati Rabani Mauri, archiepiscopi Moguntini in Germania", there is extant a work upon the miracles performed by the relics brought to Fulda by Rabanus, interspersed, according to the spirit of the times, with important historical and ethnological notes. In the "Mon. Germ. Script." (XV, 329-41) it is printed under the more correct title, "Miracula sanctorum in Fuldenses ecclesias translatorum". A similar work of much more importance historically is "Translatio sancti Alexandri Wildeshusam anno 851" in "Mon. Germ. Script.", II, 673-81, begun by Rudolf in 863 at the request of Waltbraht, a grandson of Widukin, and completed by Meginhart. Taking the "Germania" of Tacitus for his model, he pictured the history of ancient Saxony and the introduction of Christianity.


Sources

WATTENBACH, Deutschlands Geschichtsquellen im Mittelalter, II (Berlin, 1893), 227 sq., 238 sq.; POTTHAST, Bibliotheca historica medii ævi (Berlin, 1896), I, 67; II, 1151, 1429, 1540.

About this page

APA citation. Schlager, P. (1912). Rudolf of Fulda. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13218a.htm

MLA citation. Schlager, Patricius. "Rudolf of Fulda." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 13. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13218a.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by Gerald Rossi.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. February 1, 1912. Remy Lafort, D.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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