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Home > Catholic Encyclopedia > T > Temnus

Temnus

A titular see in Asia, a suffragan of Ephesus. Temnus was a little town of Æolia, near the River Hermus, which is shown on its coins. Situated on an elevation it commanded the territories of Cyme, Phocæa, and Smyrna. Under Augustus it was already on the decline; under Tiberius it was destroyed by an earthquake; and in the time of Pliny it was no longer inhabited. It was however rebuilt, and became one of the suffragans of Ephesus. Le Quien (Oriens Christ., I, 707), mentions three bishops: Eustathius, who lived in 451; Theophilus, present at the Council of Nice (787); Ignatius, at Constantinople (869). This see is not mentioned in the "Notitiae Episcopatuum". Ramsay (Asia Minor, 108) thought the diocese of Temnus identical with that of Archangelus, which from the tenth to the thirteenth century the "Notitiae Episcopatuum" assigns to Smyrna. In 1413 the Turks seized the fortress of Archangelus, which they called Kaiadjik, i.e., small rock; this fortress was situated on the plains of Maenomenus, now know as Menemen. Doubtless, Temnus and Menemen are the same. The latter is now the chief place in the vilayet of Smyrna, with 9000 inhabitants, of whom 2000 are Greeks, 500 Armenians, the remainder Mussulmans. However, Texier (Asie Mineure, 227) identifies Temnus with the village of Guzel Hissar, to the north of Menemen.

Sources

SMITH, Dict. Greek and Roman Geog. S.V.

About this page

APA citation. Pétridès, S. (1912). Temnus. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14479c.htm

MLA citation. Pétridès, Sophrone. "Temnus." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 14. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14479c.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by Thomas M. Barrett. Dedicated to the Poor Souls in Purgatory.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. July 1, 1912. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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