New Advent
 Home   Encyclopedia   Summa   Fathers   Bible   Library 
 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z 
Home > Catholic Encyclopedia > Y > Yamasee Indians

Yamasee Indians

Help support New Advent and get the full contents of this website as an instant download or CD-ROM. Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only $19.99...

A tribe of Muskhogean stock, mentioned frequently in the history of South Carolina, residing formerly near the Savannah River and in Florida. The Spanish missionaries under Fray Antonio Sedeño began to labour among them about 1570, and little trouble arose until a rebellion of the Yamasee was provoked by an attempt of the Spanish civil authorities to send some of them to the West Indies to labour. Many of the Indians fled to English territory in South Carolina and settled there. In 1715 the extortion and cruelty of the English traders drove them to take up arms, and a general massacre of white settlers took place. Eventually, however, the Indians were defeated at Salkiehatchen by Governor Craven and driven back into Florida, where they allied themselves with the Spaniards. In 1727 the English destroyed their village near St. Augustine and massacred most of them. They were finally incorporated with the Seminole and Hitchiti, and, though a small body still preserved the name in 1812, they have now disappeared. A Yamasee grammar and catechism were compiled by Domingo Báez, one of Fray Sedeño's fellow missionaries.


Sources

MOONEY in Handbook of American Indians, II (Washington, 1910).

About this page

APA citation. MacErlean, A. (1912). Yamasee Indians. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15732b.htm

MLA citation. MacErlean, Andrew. "Yamasee Indians." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 15. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15732b.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by Dennis McCarthy.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. October 1, 1912. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

Contact information. The editor of New Advent is Kevin Knight. My email address is webmaster at newadvent.org. Regrettably, I can't reply to every letter, but I greatly appreciate your feedback — especially notifications about typographical errors and inappropriate ads.

Copyright © 2012 by Kevin Knight. Dedicated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

CONTACT US