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Knights of Columbus founder Father Michael McGivney to be beatified


Father McGivney died amid a 19th-century pandemic that may have been caused by a coronavirus...


Is Allah a different God than the biblical God?


How St. Philip Neri discerned God’s will — no scrupulous anxiety, no paralysis...
Deacon Steven Greydanus
In these days between the two great solemnities of the Ascension and Pentecost, the Church holds its breath in anticipation—an anticipation greater than any except Holy Saturday and the Easter Vigil. What we look forward to is the great gift of the Holy Spirit and the birthday of the Church as we know it. The sacraments, the priesthood, the apostolic succession of bishops, the papacy, the magisterial teaching authority, the preservation of sacred tradition — all this depends on the gift of the Holy Spirit.


Record numbers leave Church in Munich archdiocese...


5 images of the Holy Spirit from Scripture...
Msgr. Charles Pope
Since Pentecost is approaching, in today’s post we will consider some of the biblical images for the Holy Spirit, and in so doing, strive to learn more about what God the Holy Spirit does for us. These descriptions do not reduce the Holy Spirit to simply fire, water, or tongues. Rather, the Holy Spirit is described as being like these things but at the same time greater than they are.


Discerning a vocation: What not to do...


What makes the ‘Star Wars’ theme so epic? A technical breakdown...


The 7 best portable grills you can buy...


Love Lifted Me: A homily for the Ascension of the Lord...


After Minnesota bishops’ planned defiance of Mass restrictions, governor eases rules...


The strange account of the day “angels” saved British troops during World War I...
John Burger
Nations and their armies have often gone to war believing “God is on our side.” In a little-known incident at the outset of World War I, that sentiment seemed to have been visibly affirmed for a number of British soldiers. In early August 1914, soon after tensions on multiple fronts and levels erupted into war, Great Britain dispatched the British Expeditionary Force


The Lord of the Flies and the Lord of All...
Angelo Stagnaro
Rutger Bregman’s excellent article The Real Lord of the Flies: What Happened When Six Boys Were Shipwrecked for 15 Months was published in London’s The Guardian a few days ago. The article explored the real-life case of a group of schoolboys who were marooned on a deserted island in 1965. Fortunately, life doesn’t always imitate art as the real case of the marooned boys turns out well and not all like British author William Golding’s magnificent 1954 bestseller, The Lord of the Flies.


This Sunday, the Great Commission and the pandemic...
Tom Hoopes
As the world starts to return — ever so slowly, step by step — toward normalcy, Catholics have an enormous opportunity to help people cope with the new world we live in. This Sunday’s Gospel — whether it’s the Seventh Sunday of Easter for you (in the ecclesial provinces of Boston, Hartford, New York, Newark, Philadelphia, or Omaha) or Ascension Sunday (everywhere else) — gives great direction about what comes next.


In this crisis, pastors have seemed more worried about the political ramifications of their actions than the pastoral fallout...
Phil Lawler
My friend and colleague Jeff Mirus cautions us that we should not rush into judgment of our Church leaders; we should not leap to a premature conclusion that they are bowing to civil authorities by restricting pastoral ministry during the current epidemic. He is right, of course, and I recognize in myself a strong tendency toward rash judgment: a tendency that I need to control.


President Trump: Churches are “essential places that provide essential services” and should reopen “right now”...


With church reopening plan, Minnesota bishops model solidarity and subsidiarity...
Fr. Raymond de Souza
As bishops decide about reopening churches and the public celebration of the liturgy, the case of Minnesota shows two key principles of Catholic social teaching in action, solidarity and subsidiarity. Minnesota’s Catholic bishops have decided to permit the reopening on May 26 of those churches that are capable of doing so. The churches that will reopen for Mass must operate at one-third capacity and have various sanitation protocols in place...


Gino Bartali: Champion cyclist, devout Catholic and secret World War II hero...

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New Advent is edited by Kevin Knight (webmasternewadvent.org)

Pope Francis held aloft the Blessed Sacrament at his extraordinary Urbi et Orbi blessing on March 27 — and Italy’s COVID-19 death rate has been dropping ever since...


COVID-19 has made it clearer than ever: Bishops, priests and deacons need better homily and social media training...


Meet the contemplative Carmelite nuns known in London as ‘the heavy artillery’...
K.V. Turley
There is a community of enclosed Carmelite nuns who are gaining a reputation in London. The community, the Carmelite Sisters in Tangiers, lives in Morocco, however, many miles from the British capital. So how have these contemplatives attracted a devoted and grateful group of supporters and friends in London, centered mainly in the capital’s business district known simply as: “The City”? In recent years, bankers, stockbrokers and City lawyers have started talking of these Carmelite nuns as “the heavy artillery.”


How St. Philip Neri defeated the devil’s attacks...
Philip Kosloski
St. Philip Neri was a holy priest during the 16th century who was widely known for his sanctity. After his death, the effectiveness of his ministry even gained him the title of “Second Apostle of Rome,” showing how much he positively influenced the city. However, his activity did not go unnoticed by his fiercest enemy, the devil. Satan tried with all his might to tempt or scare St. Philip away from his apostolic activities.


“Lord, teach us to pray” — Reflections on Fulton Sheen...


When demons flee dying people: The hidden saving power of the Divine Mercy chaplet...


How George Washington led the Continental Army, and the new nation, through two epidemics...


Out of this world we’re in...


Pope Francis entrusts China to the Blessed Virgin Mary...


The icy Antarctic village where you must have your appendix removed before moving in...


The world needs COVID-19 vaccines. It may also be overestimating their power...


3 profound things Jesus revealed to Julian of Norwich about a hazelnut...
Regis Martin
Imagine you’re having an encounter with someone really quite special. Not an avatar, for heaven sake, whose existence is entirely unreal even as you create one after another amid the sad solipsisms of cyberspace. But an actual human being, a someone with whom real presence is possible. A person, in fact, so captivating and close that nothing can get in the way to block the perfect unity of the experience. “I to my beloved, my beloved unto me.” It doesn’t get much better than that. An ideal intimacy, in short, for which nothing in this world can match the joy and the harmony it brings. And not because the two of you are identifiably the same. But because neither of you is expected to replicate the other, thus reducing real unity to a state of dull uniform sameness. In other words, it’s not about self-love, which is unfulfilling, but love of the other as other.


Opening salvos in Pope Francis’ financial ‘Reform 2.0’...
John Allen
Facing both a looming economic crisis and reminders that the anti-financial scandal measures adopted to date haven’t been fully effective, Pope Francis and his Vatican team this week have moved to try to defuse the bomb before it goes off, closing several Swiss holding companies responsible for portions of its assets and reallocating internal control over financial data collection.


Bishops should stop trying to be “players” in the larger socio-political order, and start putting God’s house in order...
Jeff Mirus
Phil Lawler made several excellent points in Rendering to Caesar in an epidemic: the limits of authority. We agree that it is not quite fair to make adverse judgments against the bishops simply for complying with civil restrictions designed to control the pandemic. But as Phil pointed out, there is certainly good reason to be concerned about the general deference of our bishops to the dominant culture, as frequently represented by civil authority.


Protecting Grandma after the pandemic: The secret war on the elderly...
Rick Becker
Back in March — remember March? It was like 100 years ago; a thousand years ago — yes, back in March, I reposted an opinion piece from the Wall Street Journal called, “Is the Coronavirus as Deadly as They say?” It was by a couple of Stanford medical researchers, Eran Bendavid and Jay Bhattacharya, who were pushing back against the COVID-19 panic. I’m an RN, and I suspected early on that this new, highly contagious disease would be deadly...


After the death of its Grand Master, tensions resurface in the Order of Malta...
Edward Pentin
The death last month of the Order of Malta’s grand master, Fra’ Giacomo Dalla Torre del Tempio di Sanguinetto, has sparked internal discussion over who could succeed him, while at the same time reigniting intrigues and painful tensions between those pushing to modernize the order and others who believe in its traditional character. Dalla Torre, a kindly and highly cultured librarian who did much for the poor and came from a noble family in Treviso...


23 dangerous things you should let your kids do...


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